DC ElementWertSprache
dc.contributor.authorLipka, Timo-
dc.contributor.authorWahn, Lennart-
dc.contributor.authorTrieu, Hoc Khiem-
dc.contributor.authorHilterhaus, Lutz-
dc.contributor.authorMüller, Jörg-
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-29T15:05:28Z-
dc.date.available2019-01-29T15:05:28Z-
dc.date.issued2013-11-05-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of nanophotonics 1 (7): 073793 (2013)de_DE
dc.identifier.issn1934-2608de_DE
dc.identifier.urihttps://tubdok.tub.tuhh.de/handle/11420/2002-
dc.description.abstractThe precise detection of chemicals and biomolecules is of great interest in the areas of biotechnology and medical diagnostics. Thus, there is a need for highly sensitive, small area, andlow-cost sensors. We fabricated and optically characterized hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic resonators for label-free lab-on-chip biosensors. The sensing was performed with small-footprint microdisk and microring resonators that detect a refractive-index change via the evanescent electric field. Homogeneous sensing with NaCl and surface-sensing experiments with immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA) were carried out. A sensitivity as high as 460 nm/RIU was measured for NaCl dissolved in deionized water for the disk, whereas about 50 nm/RIU was determined for the ring resonator. The intrinsic limits of detection were calculated to be 3.3 × 10-4 and 3.2 × 10-3 at 1550-nm wavelength. We measured the binding of BSA to functionalized ring resonators and found that molecular masses can be detected down to the clinically relevant femtogram regime. The detection and quantification of related analytes with hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic sensors can be used in medical healthcare diagnostics like point-of-care-testing and biotechnological screening.en
dc.language.isoende_DE
dc.publisherSPIEde_DE
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Nanophotonicsde_DE
dc.rightsCC BY 3.0de_DE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess-
dc.subjectamorphous siliconde_DE
dc.subjecta-Side_DE
dc.subjectHde_DE
dc.subjectphotonicsde_DE
dc.subjectmicroringde_DE
dc.subjectmicrodiskde_DE
dc.subjectresonatorde_DE
dc.subjectlabel-free biosensorde_DE
dc.subjectlab-on-chipde_DE
dc.subjectpoint-of-care diagnosticsde_DE
dc.subject.ddc530: Physikde_DE
dc.subject.ddc570: Biowissenschaften, Biologiede_DE
dc.titleLabel-free photonic biosensors fabricated with low-loss hydrogenated amorphous silicon resonatorsde_DE
dc.typeArticlede_DE
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:gbv:830-882.026235-
dc.identifier.doi10.15480/882.1999-
dc.type.diniarticle-
dc.subject.ddccode570-
dc.subject.ddccode530-
dcterms.DCMITypeText-
tuhh.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:gbv:830-882.026235-
tuhh.oai.showtruede_DE
dc.identifier.hdl11420/2002-
tuhh.abstract.englishThe precise detection of chemicals and biomolecules is of great interest in the areas of biotechnology and medical diagnostics. Thus, there is a need for highly sensitive, small area, andlow-cost sensors. We fabricated and optically characterized hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic resonators for label-free lab-on-chip biosensors. The sensing was performed with small-footprint microdisk and microring resonators that detect a refractive-index change via the evanescent electric field. Homogeneous sensing with NaCl and surface-sensing experiments with immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA) were carried out. A sensitivity as high as 460 nm/RIU was measured for NaCl dissolved in deionized water for the disk, whereas about 50 nm/RIU was determined for the ring resonator. The intrinsic limits of detection were calculated to be 3.3 × 10-4 and 3.2 × 10-3 at 1550-nm wavelength. We measured the binding of BSA to functionalized ring resonators and found that molecular masses can be detected down to the clinically relevant femtogram regime. The detection and quantification of related analytes with hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic sensors can be used in medical healthcare diagnostics like point-of-care-testing and biotechnological screening.de_DE
tuhh.publisher.doi10.1117/1.JNP.7.073793-
tuhh.publication.instituteMikrosystemtechnik E-7de_DE
tuhh.publication.instituteTechnische Biokatalyse V-6de_DE
tuhh.identifier.doi10.15480/882.1999-
tuhh.type.opus(wissenschaftlicher) Artikelde
tuhh.institute.germanTechnische Biokatalyse V-6de
tuhh.institute.englishTechnische Biokatalyse V-6de_DE
tuhh.gvk.hasppnfalse-
openaire.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessde_DE
dc.type.driverarticle-
dc.rights.ccversion3.0de_DE
dc.type.casraiJournal Articleen
tuhh.container.issue1de_DE
tuhh.container.volume7de_DE
tuhh.container.startpage073793de_DE
dc.rights.nationallicensefalsede_DE
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
item.creatorGNDLipka, Timo-
item.creatorGNDWahn, Lennart-
item.creatorGNDTrieu, Hoc Khiem-
item.creatorGNDHilterhaus, Lutz-
item.creatorGNDMüller, Jörg-
item.creatorOrcidLipka, Timo-
item.creatorOrcidWahn, Lennart-
item.creatorOrcidTrieu, Hoc Khiem-
item.creatorOrcidHilterhaus, Lutz-
item.creatorOrcidMüller, Jörg-
item.grantfulltextopen-
crisitem.author.deptMikrosystemtechnik E-7-
crisitem.author.deptMikrosystemtechnik E-7-
crisitem.author.deptMikrosystemtechnik E-7-
crisitem.author.deptTechnische Biokatalyse V-6-
crisitem.author.deptMikrosystemtechnik E-7-
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