DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHill, Eric-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jingang-
dc.contributor.authorLin, Linhan-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Yaoran-
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Yuebing-
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-12T14:43:53Z-
dc.date.available2019-06-12T14:43:53Z-
dc.date.issued2018-11-06-
dc.identifier.citationLangmuir 44 (34): 13252-13262 (2018-11-06)de_DE
dc.identifier.issn0743-7463de_DE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11420/2759-
dc.description.abstractLipid vesicles are important biological assemblies, which are critical to biological transport processes, and vesicles prepared in the lab are a workhorse for studies of drug delivery, protein unfolding, biomolecular interactions, compartmentalized chemistry, and stimuli-responsive sensing. The current method of using optical tweezers for holding lipid vesicles in place for single-vesicle studies suffers from limitations such as high optical power, rigorous optics, and small difference in the refractive indices of vesicles and water. Herein, we report the use of plasmonic heating to trap vesicles in a temperature gradient, allowing long-range attraction, parallel trapping, and dynamic manipulation. The capabilities and limitations with respect to thermal effects on vesicle structure and optical spectroscopy are discussed. This simple approach allows vesicle manipulation using down to 3 orders of magnitude lower optical power and at least an order of magnitude higher trapping stiffness per unit power than traditional optical tweezers while using a simple optical setup. In addition to the benefit provided by the relaxation of these technical constraints, this technique can complement optical tweezers to allow detailed studies on thermophoresis of optically trapped vesicles and effects of locally generated thermal gradients on the physical properties of lipid vesicles. Finally, the technique itself and the large-scale collection of vesicles have huge potential for future studies of vesicles relevant to detection of exosomes, lipid-raft formation, and other areas relevant to the life sciences.en
dc.language.isoende_DE
dc.relation.ispartofLangmuir : the ACS journal of surfaces and colloidsde_DE
dc.titleOpto-Thermophoretic Attraction, Trapping, and Dynamic Manipulation of Lipid Vesiclesde_DE
dc.typeArticlede_DE
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:gbv:830-882.035983-
dc.type.diniarticle-
dcterms.DCMITypeText-
tuhh.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:gbv:830-882.035983-
tuhh.abstract.englishLipid vesicles are important biological assemblies, which are critical to biological transport processes, and vesicles prepared in the lab are a workhorse for studies of drug delivery, protein unfolding, biomolecular interactions, compartmentalized chemistry, and stimuli-responsive sensing. The current method of using optical tweezers for holding lipid vesicles in place for single-vesicle studies suffers from limitations such as high optical power, rigorous optics, and small difference in the refractive indices of vesicles and water. Herein, we report the use of plasmonic heating to trap vesicles in a temperature gradient, allowing long-range attraction, parallel trapping, and dynamic manipulation. The capabilities and limitations with respect to thermal effects on vesicle structure and optical spectroscopy are discussed. This simple approach allows vesicle manipulation using down to 3 orders of magnitude lower optical power and at least an order of magnitude higher trapping stiffness per unit power than traditional optical tweezers while using a simple optical setup. In addition to the benefit provided by the relaxation of these technical constraints, this technique can complement optical tweezers to allow detailed studies on thermophoresis of optically trapped vesicles and effects of locally generated thermal gradients on the physical properties of lipid vesicles. Finally, the technique itself and the large-scale collection of vesicles have huge potential for future studies of vesicles relevant to detection of exosomes, lipid-raft formation, and other areas relevant to the life sciences.de_DE
tuhh.publisher.doi10.1021/acs.langmuir.8b01979-
tuhh.publication.instituteKeramische Hochleistungswerkstoffe M-9de_DE
tuhh.type.opus(wissenschaftlicher) Artikel-
tuhh.institute.germanKeramische Hochleistungswerkstoffe M-9de
tuhh.institute.englishKeramische Hochleistungswerkstoffe M-9de_DE
tuhh.gvk.hasppnfalse-
dc.type.driverarticle-
dc.type.casraiJournal Article-
tuhh.container.issue44de_DE
tuhh.container.volume34de_DE
tuhh.container.startpage13252de_DE
tuhh.container.endpage13262de_DE
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.creatorGNDHill, Eric-
item.creatorGNDLi, Jingang-
item.creatorGNDLin, Linhan-
item.creatorGNDLiu, Yaoran-
item.creatorGNDZheng, Yuebing-
item.languageiso639-1other-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.creatorOrcidHill, Eric-
item.creatorOrcidLi, Jingang-
item.creatorOrcidLin, Linhan-
item.creatorOrcidLiu, Yaoran-
item.creatorOrcidZheng, Yuebing-
crisitem.author.deptKeramische Hochleistungswerkstoffe M-9-
crisitem.author.parentorgStudiendekanat Maschinenbau-
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