DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLützner, Jörg-
dc.contributor.authorGünther, Klaus-Peter-
dc.contributor.authorPostler, Anne-
dc.contributor.authorMorlock, Michael-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-31T12:03:04Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-31T12:03:04Z-
dc.date.issued2020-08-01-
dc.identifier.citationZeitschrift fur Orthopadie und Unfallchirurgie 4 (158): 369-382 (2020-08-01)de_DE
dc.identifier.issn1864-6743de_DE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11420/7184-
dc.description.abstractThieme. All rights reserved. All metal implants in human bodies corrode which results in metal ions release. This is not necessarily a problem and represents for most patients no hazard. However, if a critical metal ion concentration is exceeded, local or rarely systemic problems can occur. This article summarizes the mechanisms of metal ion release and its clinical consequences. Several situations can result in increased metal ion release: metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties with increased wear, increased micromotion at taper interfaces, direct metal-metal contact (polyethylene wear, impingement), erroneously used metal heads after ceramic head fracture. Possible problems are in most cases located close to the concerned joint. Furthermore, there are reports about toxic damage to several organs. Most of these reports refer to erroneously used metal heads in revisions after a broken ceramic head. There is currently no evidence of carcinogenic or teratogenic effects of implants but data is not sufficient to exclude possible effects. Cobalt and chromium blood levels (favorably in whole blood) should be measured in patients with suspected elevated metal ions. According to current knowledge levels below 2 µg/l seem to be uncritical, levels between 2 and 7 µg/l are considered borderline with unknown biological consequences and levels above 7 µg/l indicate a local problem which should be further diagnosed. Metal ion levels always need to be interpreted together with clinical symptoms and imaging results.en
dc.language.isodede_DE
dc.relation.ispartofZeitschrift für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgiede_DE
dc.titleMetallionenfreisetzung nach Hüft- und Kniegelenkendoprothetik – Mechanismen, biologische Wirkungen und notwendige Diagnostik [Metal Ion Release after Hip and Knee Arthroplasty - Causes, Biological Effects and Diagnostics]de_DE
dc.typeArticlede_DE
dc.type.diniarticle-
dcterms.DCMITypeText-
tuhh.abstract.englishThieme. All rights reserved. All metal implants in human bodies corrode which results in metal ions release. This is not necessarily a problem and represents for most patients no hazard. However, if a critical metal ion concentration is exceeded, local or rarely systemic problems can occur. This article summarizes the mechanisms of metal ion release and its clinical consequences. Several situations can result in increased metal ion release: metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties with increased wear, increased micromotion at taper interfaces, direct metal-metal contact (polyethylene wear, impingement), erroneously used metal heads after ceramic head fracture. Possible problems are in most cases located close to the concerned joint. Furthermore, there are reports about toxic damage to several organs. Most of these reports refer to erroneously used metal heads in revisions after a broken ceramic head. There is currently no evidence of carcinogenic or teratogenic effects of implants but data is not sufficient to exclude possible effects. Cobalt and chromium blood levels (favorably in whole blood) should be measured in patients with suspected elevated metal ions. According to current knowledge levels below 2 µg/l seem to be uncritical, levels between 2 and 7 µg/l are considered borderline with unknown biological consequences and levels above 7 µg/l indicate a local problem which should be further diagnosed. Metal ion levels always need to be interpreted together with clinical symptoms and imaging results.de_DE
tuhh.publisher.doi10.1055/a-0929-8121-
tuhh.publication.instituteBiomechanik M-3de_DE
tuhh.type.opus(wissenschaftlicher) Artikel-
dc.type.driverarticle-
dc.type.casraiJournal Article-
tuhh.container.issue4de_DE
tuhh.container.volume158de_DE
tuhh.container.startpage369de_DE
tuhh.container.endpage382de_DE
dc.identifier.pmid31820432-
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85089787543-
item.creatorGNDLützner, Jörg-
item.creatorGNDGünther, Klaus-Peter-
item.creatorGNDPostler, Anne-
item.creatorGNDMorlock, Michael-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.languageiso639-1de-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.openairetypeArticle-
item.creatorOrcidLützner, Jörg-
item.creatorOrcidGünther, Klaus-Peter-
item.creatorOrcidPostler, Anne-
item.creatorOrcidMorlock, Michael-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.mappedtypeArticle-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501-
crisitem.author.deptBiomechanik M-3-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0002-7162-828X-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0002-5330-2454-
crisitem.author.parentorgStudiendekanat Maschinenbau-
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