Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.15480/882.75
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DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchild, Katharina-
dc.contributor.authorHerstatt, Cornelius-
dc.contributor.authorLüthje, Christian-
dc.date.accessioned2005-12-23T11:44:38Zde_DE
dc.date.available2005-12-23T11:44:38Zde_DE
dc.date.issued2004de_DE
dc.identifier.urihttp://tubdok.tub.tuhh.de/handle/11420/77-
dc.description.abstractAnalogies can trigger breakthrough ideas in new product development. Numerous examples demonstrate that substantial innovations often result from transferring problem solutions from one industry or domain to another. For instance, the designers of the new running shoe generation of Nike, “Nike SHOX”, use the same suspension concept like the technologies applied for Formula 1 racing cars, or the biological Lotus-effect led to the development of various self-cleaning surfaces. Academic research on analogical thinking has been so far heavily influenced by general theoretical work from cognitive psychology or systematic inventing. Only a small number of studies have investigated the application of analogies in the specific context of breakthrough innovation projects. This paper focuses on the question how analogies can be systematically used in the early innovation phases of new product development and which factors influence the successful use of analogical thinking in innovating companies. Special attention is paid to organizational facilitators and the requests on people involved in this process.de
dc.language.isoende_DE
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking paper // Technologie- und Innovationsmanagement, Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg = Arbeitspapier;24de_DE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess-
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleHow to use analogies for breakthrough innovationsde_DE
dc.typeTechnical Reportde_DE
dc.date.updated2006-01-20T15:03:19Zde_DE
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:gbv:830-opus-1332de_DE
dc.identifier.doi10.15480/882.75-
dc.type.dinireport-
dc.subject.bcl85.15:Forschung und Entwicklungde
dc.subject.gndProduktinnovationde
dc.subject.gndProduktentwicklungde
dc.subject.gndErfindungde
dc.subject.bclcode85.15-
dc.subject.ddccode330-
dcterms.DCMITypeText-
tuhh.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:gbv:830-opus-1332de_DE
tuhh.publikation.typreportde_DE
tuhh.opus.id133de_DE
tuhh.oai.showtruede_DE
dc.identifier.hdl11420/77-
tuhh.abstract.germanAnalogies can trigger breakthrough ideas in new product development. Numerous examples demonstrate that substantial innovations often result from transferring problem solutions from one industry or domain to another. For instance, the designers of the new running shoe generation of Nike, “Nike SHOX”, use the same suspension concept like the technologies applied for Formula 1 racing cars, or the biological Lotus-effect led to the development of various self-cleaning surfaces. Academic research on analogical thinking has been so far heavily influenced by general theoretical work from cognitive psychology or systematic inventing. Only a small number of studies have investigated the application of analogies in the specific context of breakthrough innovation projects. This paper focuses on the question how analogies can be systematically used in the early innovation phases of new product development and which factors influence the successful use of analogical thinking in innovating companies. Special attention is paid to organizational facilitators and the requests on people involved in this process.de_DE
tuhh.publication.instituteTechnologie- und Innovationsmanagement W-7de_DE
tuhh.identifier.doi10.15480/882.75-
tuhh.type.opusReport (Bericht)-
tuhh.institute.germanTechnologie- und Innovationsmanagement W-7de
tuhh.institute.englishTechnology and Innovation Management W-7en
tuhh.institute.id13de_DE
tuhh.type.id20de_DE
tuhh.gvk.hasppnfalse-
tuhh.series.nameWorking paper // Technologie- und Innovationsmanagement, Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg = Arbeitspapierde
dc.type.driverreport-
dc.identifier.oclc930767938-
dc.type.casraiReport-
tuhh.relation.ispartofseriesWorking paper // Technologie- und Innovationsmanagement, Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg = Arbeitspapier-
tuhh.relation.ispartofseriesnumber24de
item.grantfulltextopen-
item.creatorGNDSchild, Katharina-
item.creatorGNDHerstatt, Cornelius-
item.creatorGNDLüthje, Christian-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18gh-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
item.tuhhseriesidWorking paper // Technologie- und Innovationsmanagement, Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg = Arbeitspapier-
item.openairetypeTechnical Report-
item.creatorOrcidSchild, Katharina-
item.creatorOrcidHerstatt, Cornelius-
item.creatorOrcidLüthje, Christian-
item.seriesrefWorking paper // Technologie- und Innovationsmanagement, Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg = Arbeitspapier;24-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
crisitem.author.deptTechnologie- und Innovationsmanagement W-7-
crisitem.author.deptInnovationsmarketing W-3-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0001-5585-1169-
crisitem.author.parentorgStudiendekanat Management-Wissenschaften und Technologie-
crisitem.author.parentorgStudiendekanat Management-Wissenschaften und Technologie-
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