DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFröndhoff, Dario-
dc.contributor.authorSchaldach, Ruth-
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-24T08:53:01Z-
dc.date.available2021-06-24T08:53:01Z-
dc.date.issued2018-01-
dc.identifier.citationRUVIVAL publication series 3: 19-26 (2018-01)de_DE
dc.identifier.issn2567-8531de_DE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11420/9773-
dc.description.abstractTerra Preta Sanitation (TPS) is an astonishing biowaste/sanitation system from a highly advanced ancient culture. It shows great potential for soil building and nutrient recycling from excreta. TPS was and is developed based on a rediscovered historic practice. TPS systems treat excreta and produce valuable soil amendments. Such sanitation systems can contribute to attaining particular Sustainable Development Goals. Findings of highly fertile soils in the Amazon region initiated research in this field of study. Archaeological research revealed that Terra Preta was produced from biowaste and excreta with charcoal additives and layers of pieces from broken ceramic. The Institute of Wastewater Management and Water Protection (AWW) at Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH) conducted research on lactic acid fermentation (LAF) and vermicomposting, with a special focus on sanitisation and process conditions. The AWW performed case studies in India, the Philippines and Ethiopia and developed implementation strategies for conventional and new sanitation systems. Moreover, the Institute facilitated the design of a container toilet for Terra Preta Sanitation, which is adjusted to different cultural requirements. LAF can make the collection over longer timespans odour free and sanitised at the same time. The downside is a demand for a sugar additive, however, this can be solved by the addition of biowaste. This literature review gives an overview of the current state of research conducted at the Institute of Wastewater Management and Water Protection (AWW) at the Hamburg University of Technology.en
dc.language.isoende_DE
dc.subject.ddc000: Allgemeines, Wissenschaftde_DE
dc.titleA Review of Terra Preta Sanitation with a Focus on the Research Outcomes of the Institute of Wastewater Management and Water Protection (AWW)de_DE
dc.typeArticlede_DE
dc.type.diniarticle-
dcterms.DCMITypeText-
tuhh.abstract.englishTerra Preta Sanitation (TPS) is an astonishing biowaste/sanitation system from a highly advanced ancient culture. It shows great potential for soil building and nutrient recycling from excreta. TPS was and is developed based on a rediscovered historic practice. TPS systems treat excreta and produce valuable soil amendments. Such sanitation systems can contribute to attaining particular Sustainable Development Goals. Findings of highly fertile soils in the Amazon region initiated research in this field of study. Archaeological research revealed that Terra Preta was produced from biowaste and excreta with charcoal additives and layers of pieces from broken ceramic. The Institute of Wastewater Management and Water Protection (AWW) at Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH) conducted research on lactic acid fermentation (LAF) and vermicomposting, with a special focus on sanitisation and process conditions. The AWW performed case studies in India, the Philippines and Ethiopia and developed implementation strategies for conventional and new sanitation systems. Moreover, the Institute facilitated the design of a container toilet for Terra Preta Sanitation, which is adjusted to different cultural requirements. LAF can make the collection over longer timespans odour free and sanitised at the same time. The downside is a demand for a sugar additive, however, this can be solved by the addition of biowaste. This literature review gives an overview of the current state of research conducted at the Institute of Wastewater Management and Water Protection (AWW) at the Hamburg University of Technology.de_DE
tuhh.publication.instituteAbwasserwirtschaft und Gewässerschutz B-2de_DE
tuhh.type.opus(wissenschaftlicher) Artikel-
tuhh.gvk.hasppnfalse-
tuhh.hasurnfalse-
dc.type.driverarticle-
dc.type.casraiJournal Article-
tuhh.container.startpage19de_DE
tuhh.container.endpage29de_DE
tuhh.relation.ispartofseriesRUVIVAL publication seriesde_DE
tuhh.relation.ispartofseriesnumberVolume 3de_DE
datacite.relation.IsPartOfhttps://doi.org/10.15480/882.1508-
local.status.inpressfalsede_DE
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501-
item.tuhhseriesidRUVIVAL publication series-
item.creatorOrcidFröndhoff, Dario-
item.creatorOrcidSchaldach, Ruth-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.seriesrefRUVIVAL publication series;Volume 3-
item.mappedtypeArticle-
item.openairetypeArticle-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.creatorGNDFröndhoff, Dario-
item.creatorGNDSchaldach, Ruth-
item.languageiso639-1en-
crisitem.author.deptAbwasserwirtschaft und Gewässerschutz B-2-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0003-4313-7317-
crisitem.author.parentorgStudiendekanat Bauwesen-
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