Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.15480/882.1972
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchmitz, Mathias-
dc.contributor.authorSchmitz, Gerhard-
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-17T10:50:48Z-
dc.date.available2019-01-17T10:50:48Z-
dc.date.issued2018-09-07-
dc.identifier.citationAerospace Science and Technology (82-83): 294-303 (2018-11-01)de_DE
dc.identifier.issn1626-3219de_DE
dc.identifier.urihttps://tubdok.tub.tuhh.de/handle/11420/1975-
dc.description.abstractIce formations in aircraft fuel systems pose a serious safety threat with potentially disastrous consequences, when restricting the fuel flow towards the engines. This is an ongoing challenge in the aerospace industry. In this work experimental studies have been performed to investigate the effects of temperature, flow rate and surface properties on the accretion and release of ice in flowing fuel. A test rig with a glass-windowed pipe has been employed to quantitatively measure the transient icing process under controlled conditions. The accreted ice exhibited soft and fluffy characteristics and was most likely the result of impinging solid ice particles that were entrained in the fuel flow. The ice particles were most sticky in a temperature range between −6°C and −20°C. The thickness of accreted ice decreased with roughness on aluminium surfaces and there was a significant reduction on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) in comparison to aluminium, copper or stainless steel surfaces. Comparison of the thickness of accreted ice with the ice adhesion strength reported in the literature showed a clear correlation. The experimental results will help to gain better understanding of the ice accretion process in flowing fuel and may serve as basis for design guidelines to minimize ice formation within an aircraft fuel system.en
dc.language.isoende_DE
dc.publisherElsevierde_DE
dc.relation.ispartofAerospace science and technologyde_DE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess-
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectFuel systemde_DE
dc.subjectAviation fuelde_DE
dc.subjectLow temperaturesde_DE
dc.subjectWaterde_DE
dc.subjectIce accretionde_DE
dc.subjectIce formationde_DE
dc.subject.ddc600: Technikde_DE
dc.titleExperimental study on the accretion and release of ice in aviation jet fuelde_DE
dc.typeArticlede_DE
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:gbv:830-882.025653-
dc.identifier.doi10.15480/882.1972-
dc.type.diniarticle-
dc.subject.ddccode600-
dcterms.DCMITypeText-
tuhh.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:gbv:830-882.025653-
tuhh.oai.showtruede_DE
dc.identifier.hdl11420/1975-
tuhh.abstract.englishIce formations in aircraft fuel systems pose a serious safety threat with potentially disastrous consequences, when restricting the fuel flow towards the engines. This is an ongoing challenge in the aerospace industry. In this work experimental studies have been performed to investigate the effects of temperature, flow rate and surface properties on the accretion and release of ice in flowing fuel. A test rig with a glass-windowed pipe has been employed to quantitatively measure the transient icing process under controlled conditions. The accreted ice exhibited soft and fluffy characteristics and was most likely the result of impinging solid ice particles that were entrained in the fuel flow. The ice particles were most sticky in a temperature range between −6°C and −20°C. The thickness of accreted ice decreased with roughness on aluminium surfaces and there was a significant reduction on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) in comparison to aluminium, copper or stainless steel surfaces. Comparison of the thickness of accreted ice with the ice adhesion strength reported in the literature showed a clear correlation. The experimental results will help to gain better understanding of the ice accretion process in flowing fuel and may serve as basis for design guidelines to minimize ice formation within an aircraft fuel system.de_DE
tuhh.publisher.doi10.1016/j.ast.2018.08.034-
tuhh.publication.instituteTechnische Thermodynamik M-21de_DE
tuhh.identifier.doi10.15480/882.1972-
tuhh.type.opus(wissenschaftlicher) Artikel-
tuhh.institute.germanTechnische Thermodynamik M-21de
tuhh.institute.englishTechnische Thermodynamik M-21de_DE
tuhh.gvk.hasppnfalse-
openaire.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessde_DE
dc.type.driverarticle-
dc.rights.ccversion4.0de_DE
dc.type.casraiJournal Article-
tuhh.container.volume82-83de_DE
tuhh.container.startpage294de_DE
tuhh.container.endpage303de_DE
dc.rights.nationallicensefalsede_DE
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
item.openairetypeArticle-
item.grantfulltextopen-
item.creatorOrcidSchmitz, Mathias-
item.creatorOrcidSchmitz, Gerhard-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501-
item.creatorGNDSchmitz, Mathias-
item.creatorGNDSchmitz, Gerhard-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
crisitem.author.deptTechnische Thermodynamik M-21-
crisitem.author.deptTechnische Thermodynamik M-21-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0002-6702-5929-
crisitem.author.parentorgStudiendekanat Maschinenbau-
crisitem.author.parentorgStudiendekanat Maschinenbau-
Appears in Collections:Publications with fulltext
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
1-s2.0-S1270963818309313-main.pdfVerlags-PDF1,49 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open
Show simple item record

Page view(s)

163
Last Week
0
Last month
1
checked on Oct 20, 2020

Download(s)

196
checked on Oct 20, 2020

Google ScholarTM

Check

Note about this record

Export

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons