Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.15480/882.3767
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSpille, Claas-
dc.contributor.authorTholan, Vaishakh Prasannan-
dc.contributor.authorStraiton, Benjamin-
dc.contributor.authorJohannsen, Monika-
dc.contributor.authorHoffmann, Marko-
dc.contributor.authorMarashdeh, Qussai-
dc.contributor.authorSchlüter, Michael-
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-10T15:19:43Z-
dc.date.available2021-09-10T15:19:43Z-
dc.date.issued2021-09-08-
dc.identifier.citationFluids 6 (9): 321 (2021)de_DE
dc.identifier.issn2311-5521de_DE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11420/10327-
dc.description.abstractAgainst the background of current and future global challenges, such as climate change, process engineering requires increasingly specific solutions adapted to the respective problem or application, especially in gas–liquid contact apparatuses. One possibility to adjust the conditions in this kind of apparatuses is an intelligent and customized structuring, which leads to consistent fluid properties and flow characteristics within the reactor. In the course of this, the interfacial area for mass transfer, as well as residence times, have to be adjusted and optimized specifically for the respective application. In order to better understand and advance the research on intelligent customized additively manufactured lattice structures (AMLS), the phase distributions and local gas holdups that are essential for mass transfer are investigated for different structures and flow conditions. For the first time a tomographic measurement technique is used, the Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT), and validated with the volume expansion method and a fiber optical needle probe (A2PS-B-POP) for an air-water system for different modes of operation (with or without co-current liquid flow in empty or packed state). The ECVT proved to be particularly useful for both in the empty tube and the packed state and provided new insights into the phase distributions occurring within structured packings, which would have led to significantly underestimated results based on the visual reference measurements, especially for a densely packed additively manufactured lattice structure (5 mm cubic on the tip). Particularly for the modified structures, which were supposed to show local targeted differences, the ECVT was able to resolve the changes locally. The additional use of a pump for co-current flow operation resulted in slightly higher fluctuations within the ECVT data, although local events could still be resolved sufficiently. The final comparison of the empty tube at rest data with a fiber optical needle probe showed that the results were in good agreement and that the local deviations were due to general differences in the respective measurement techniques.-
dc.description.abstractAgainst the background of current and future global challenges, such as climate change, process engineering requires increasingly specific solutions adapted to the respective problem or application, especially in gas–liquid contact apparatuses. One possibility to adjust the conditions in this kind of apparatuses is an intelligent and customized structuring, which leads to consistent fluid properties and flow characteristics within the reactor. In the course of this, the interfacial area for mass transfer, as well as residence times, have to be adjusted and optimized specifically for the respective application. In order to better understand and advance the research on intelligent customized additively manufactured lattice structures (AMLS), the phase distributions and local gas holdups that are essential for mass transfer are investigated for different structures and flow conditions. For the first time a tomographic measurement technique is used, the Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT), and validated with the volume expansion method and a fiber optical needle probe (A2PS-B-POP) for an air-water system for different modes of operation (with or without co-current liquid flow in empty or packed state). The ECVT proved to be particularly useful for both in the empty tube and the packed state and provided new insights into the phase distributions occurring within structured packings, which would have led to significantly underestimated results based on the visual reference measurements, especially for a densely packed additively manufactured lattice structure (5 mm cubic on the tip). Particularly for the modified structures, which were supposed to show local targeted differences, the ECVT was able to resolve the changes locally. The additional use of a pump for co-current flow operation resulted in slightly higher fluctuations within the ECVT data, although local events could still be resolved sufficiently. The final comparison of the empty tube at rest data with a fiber optical needle probe showed that the results were in good agreement and that the local deviations were due to general differences in the respective measurement techniques.en
dc.language.isoende_DE
dc.publisherMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institutede_DE
dc.relation.ispartofFluidsde_DE
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0de_DE
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/de_DE
dc.subject.ddc600: Technikde_DE
dc.titleElectrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT) for Characterization of Additively Manufactured Lattice Structures (AMLS) in Gas-Liquid Systemsde_DE
dc.typeArticlede_DE
dc.date.updated2021-09-09T13:39:23Z-
dc.identifier.doi10.15480/882.3767-
dc.type.diniarticle-
dcterms.DCMITypeText-
tuhh.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:gbv:830-882.0144801-
tuhh.oai.showtruede_DE
tuhh.abstract.englishAgainst the background of current and future global challenges, such as climate change, process engineering requires increasingly specific solutions adapted to the respective problem or application, especially in gas–liquid contact apparatuses. One possibility to adjust the conditions in this kind of apparatuses is an intelligent and customized structuring, which leads to consistent fluid properties and flow characteristics within the reactor. In the course of this, the interfacial area for mass transfer, as well as residence times, have to be adjusted and optimized specifically for the respective application. In order to better understand and advance the research on intelligent customized additively manufactured lattice structures (AMLS), the phase distributions and local gas holdups that are essential for mass transfer are investigated for different structures and flow conditions. For the first time a tomographic measurement technique is used, the Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT), and validated with the volume expansion method and a fiber optical needle probe (A2PS-B-POP) for an air-water system for different modes of operation (with or without co-current liquid flow in empty or packed state). The ECVT proved to be particularly useful for both in the empty tube and the packed state and provided new insights into the phase distributions occurring within structured packings, which would have led to significantly underestimated results based on the visual reference measurements, especially for a densely packed additively manufactured lattice structure (5 mm cubic on the tip). Particularly for the modified structures, which were supposed to show local targeted differences, the ECVT was able to resolve the changes locally. The additional use of a pump for co-current flow operation resulted in slightly higher fluctuations within the ECVT data, although local events could still be resolved sufficiently. The final comparison of the empty tube at rest data with a fiber optical needle probe showed that the results were in good agreement and that the local deviations were due to general differences in the respective measurement techniques.de_DE
tuhh.publisher.doi10.3390/fluids6090321-
tuhh.publication.instituteMehrphasenströmungen V-5de_DE
tuhh.identifier.doi10.15480/882.3767-
tuhh.type.opus(wissenschaftlicher) Artikel-
dc.type.driverarticle-
dc.type.casraiJournal Article-
tuhh.container.issue9de_DE
tuhh.container.volume6de_DE
dc.relation.projectPublikationsfonds 2021-
dc.rights.nationallicensefalsede_DE
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85114693115de_DE
tuhh.container.articlenumber321de_DE
local.status.inpressfalsede_DE
local.type.versionpublishedVersionde_DE
item.creatorOrcidSpille, Claas-
item.creatorOrcidTholan, Vaishakh Prasannan-
item.creatorOrcidStraiton, Benjamin-
item.creatorOrcidJohannsen, Monika-
item.creatorOrcidHoffmann, Marko-
item.creatorOrcidMarashdeh, Qussai-
item.creatorOrcidSchlüter, Michael-
item.openairetypeArticle-
item.grantfulltextopen-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
item.creatorGNDSpille, Claas-
item.creatorGNDTholan, Vaishakh Prasannan-
item.creatorGNDStraiton, Benjamin-
item.creatorGNDJohannsen, Monika-
item.creatorGNDHoffmann, Marko-
item.creatorGNDMarashdeh, Qussai-
item.creatorGNDSchlüter, Michael-
item.mappedtypeArticle-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
crisitem.author.deptMehrphasenströmungen V-5-
crisitem.author.deptMehrphasenströmungen V-5-
crisitem.author.deptMehrphasenströmungen V-5-
crisitem.author.deptMehrphasenströmungen V-5-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0002-7307-1251-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0001-8585-4547-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0001-5969-2150-
crisitem.author.parentorgStudiendekanat Verfahrenstechnik-
crisitem.author.parentorgStudiendekanat Verfahrenstechnik-
crisitem.author.parentorgStudiendekanat Verfahrenstechnik-
crisitem.author.parentorgStudiendekanat Verfahrenstechnik-
crisitem.project.funderTechnische Universität Hamburg-
crisitem.project.funderrorid04bs1pb34-
Appears in Collections:Publications with fulltext
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
fluids-06-00321.pdfVerlags-PDF6,34 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Thumbnail
Show simple item record

Page view(s)

69
Last Week
9
Last month
checked on Oct 17, 2021

Download(s)

21
checked on Oct 17, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check

Note about this record

Cite this record

Export

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons