DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGronwald, Peer-Ole-
dc.contributor.authorWiese, Niels-
dc.contributor.authorKern, Thorsten Alexander-
dc.contributor.authorHenke, Markus-
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-20T06:30:18Z-
dc.date.available2022-09-20T06:30:18Z-
dc.date.issued2022-
dc.identifier.citationIEEE Transactions on Transportation Electrification (in Press): (2022)de_DE
dc.identifier.issn2332-7782de_DE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11420/13629-
dc.description.abstractThe growing interest in electric vehicles leads to new developments of efficient electric traction motors with high power density. Since a large part of the losses in an electric motor can occur in the windings, it is important to cool the windings to reduce the temperature and protect the winding insulation from thermal aging. Oil spray cooling systems are becoming more and more relevant for cooling the windings. In this work, an approach for heat transfer modeling of electric traction motors (power classes #2-4 with 60 to 180kW) with hairpin end windings is developed and tested. The model is developed with a testing rig for different flat jet spray nozzle arrangements for a hairpin electric traction motor. The model approach showed a good agreement with the measured temperatures of the end windings in the testing rig. A transient thermal simulation of the testing rig confirms the good agreement. In a second step the model approach is transferred to another electric traction motor with a different spray cooling system. The simulation results of the second electric traction motor also show good agreement with thermal quasi-static operating points and transient measurements at low and medium speed. At high speeds the deviations increased. Possible causes for this behavior are discussed.en
dc.language.isoende_DE
dc.publisherIEEEde_DE
dc.relation.ispartofIEEE transactions on transportation electrificationde_DE
dc.subjectCoolingde_DE
dc.subjectHeat transferde_DE
dc.subjectTestingde_DE
dc.subjectWindingsde_DE
dc.subjectStator windingsde_DE
dc.subjectTraction motorsde_DE
dc.subjectTemperature measurementde_DE
dc.subjectTraction motor drivesde_DE
dc.subjectElectric machinesde_DE
dc.subjectRoad vehicle propulsionde_DE
dc.subjectRoad vehicle electric propulsionde_DE
dc.subjectMotor drivesde_DE
dc.subjectHeat treatmentde_DE
dc.subject.ddc600: Technikde_DE
dc.subject.ddc620: Ingenieurwissenschaftende_DE
dc.titleElectric traction motor spray cooling : empirical model development and experimental validationde_DE
dc.typeArticlede_DE
dc.type.diniarticle-
dcterms.DCMITypeText-
tuhh.abstract.englishThe growing interest in electric vehicles leads to new developments of efficient electric traction motors with high power density. Since a large part of the losses in an electric motor can occur in the windings, it is important to cool the windings to reduce the temperature and protect the winding insulation from thermal aging. Oil spray cooling systems are becoming more and more relevant for cooling the windings. In this work, an approach for heat transfer modeling of electric traction motors (power classes #2-4 with 60 to 180kW) with hairpin end windings is developed and tested. The model is developed with a testing rig for different flat jet spray nozzle arrangements for a hairpin electric traction motor. The model approach showed a good agreement with the measured temperatures of the end windings in the testing rig. A transient thermal simulation of the testing rig confirms the good agreement. In a second step the model approach is transferred to another electric traction motor with a different spray cooling system. The simulation results of the second electric traction motor also show good agreement with thermal quasi-static operating points and transient measurements at low and medium speed. At high speeds the deviations increased. Possible causes for this behavior are discussed.de_DE
tuhh.publisher.doi10.1109/TTE.2022.3206031-
tuhh.publication.instituteMechatronik im Maschinenbau M-4de_DE
tuhh.type.opus(wissenschaftlicher) Artikel-
dc.type.driverarticle-
dc.type.casraiJournal Article-
tuhh.container.startpage1de_DE
tuhh.container.endpage1de_DE
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85139403898de_DE
local.status.inpresstruede_DE
local.publisher.peerreviewedtruede_DE
datacite.resourceTypeArticle-
datacite.resourceTypeGeneralJournalArticle-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.openairetypeArticle-
item.creatorOrcidGronwald, Peer-Ole-
item.creatorOrcidWiese, Niels-
item.creatorOrcidKern, Thorsten Alexander-
item.creatorOrcidHenke, Markus-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.creatorGNDGronwald, Peer-Ole-
item.creatorGNDWiese, Niels-
item.creatorGNDKern, Thorsten Alexander-
item.creatorGNDHenke, Markus-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501-
item.mappedtypeArticle-
crisitem.author.deptMechatronik im Maschinenbau M-4-
crisitem.author.deptMechatronik im Maschinenbau M-4-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0003-2539-9532-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0002-4985-693X-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0002-3336-4383-
crisitem.author.parentorgStudiendekanat Maschinenbau-
crisitem.author.parentorgStudiendekanat Maschinenbau-
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