DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKaul, Michael-
dc.contributor.authorSalamon, Johannes-
dc.contributor.authorKnopp, Tobias-
dc.contributor.authorIttrich, Harald-
dc.contributor.authorAdam, Gerhard-
dc.contributor.authorWeller, Horst-
dc.contributor.authorJung, Caroline-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-26T07:45:40Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-26T07:45:40Z-
dc.date.issued2018-03-16-
dc.identifier.citationPhysics in medicine and biology 6 (63): 064001- (2018)de_DE
dc.identifier.issn0031-9155de_DE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11420/2514-
dc.description.abstractMagnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging technology. It is a potential candidate to be used for angiographic purposes, to study perfusion and cell migration. The aim of this work was to measure velocities of the flowing blood in the inferior vena cava of mice, using MPI, and to evaluate it in comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A phantom mimicking the flow within the inferior vena cava with velocities of up to 21 cm s-1 was used for the evaluation of the applied analysis techniques. Time-density and distance-density analyses for bolus tracking were performed to calculate flow velocities. These findings were compared with the calibrated velocities set by a flow pump, and it can be concluded that velocities of up to 21 cm s-1 can be measured by MPI. A time-density analysis using an arrival time estimation algorithm showed the best agreement with the preset velocities. In vivo measurements were performed in healthy FVB mice (n  =  10). MRI experiments were performed using phase contrast (PC) for velocity mapping. For MPI measurements, a standardized injection of a superparamagnetic iron oxide tracer was applied. In vivo MPI data were evaluated by a time-density analysis and compared to PC MRI. A Bland-Altman analysis revealed good agreement between the in vivo velocities acquired by MRI of 4.0  ±  1.5 cm s-1 and those measured by MPI of 4.8  ±  1.1 cm s-1. Magnetic particle imaging is a new tool with which to measure and quantify flow velocities. It is fast, radiation-free, and produces 3D images. It therefore offers the potential for vascular imaging.en
dc.language.isoende_DE
dc.relation.ispartofPhysics in medicine and biologyde_DE
dc.subjectAnimalsde_DE
dc.subjectBlood Flow Velocityde_DE
dc.subjectImage Processing, Computer-Assistedde_DE
dc.subjectImaging, Three-Dimensionalde_DE
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imagingde_DE
dc.subjectMicede_DE
dc.subjectMolecular Imagingde_DE
dc.subjectHemodynamicsde_DE
dc.subjectPhantoms, Imagingde_DE
dc.titleMagnetic particle imaging for in vivo blood flow velocity measurements in micede_DE
dc.typeArticlede_DE
dc.type.diniarticle-
dcterms.DCMITypeText-
tuhh.abstract.englishMagnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging technology. It is a potential candidate to be used for angiographic purposes, to study perfusion and cell migration. The aim of this work was to measure velocities of the flowing blood in the inferior vena cava of mice, using MPI, and to evaluate it in comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A phantom mimicking the flow within the inferior vena cava with velocities of up to 21 cm s-1 was used for the evaluation of the applied analysis techniques. Time-density and distance-density analyses for bolus tracking were performed to calculate flow velocities. These findings were compared with the calibrated velocities set by a flow pump, and it can be concluded that velocities of up to 21 cm s-1 can be measured by MPI. A time-density analysis using an arrival time estimation algorithm showed the best agreement with the preset velocities. In vivo measurements were performed in healthy FVB mice (n  =  10). MRI experiments were performed using phase contrast (PC) for velocity mapping. For MPI measurements, a standardized injection of a superparamagnetic iron oxide tracer was applied. In vivo MPI data were evaluated by a time-density analysis and compared to PC MRI. A Bland-Altman analysis revealed good agreement between the in vivo velocities acquired by MRI of 4.0  ±  1.5 cm s-1 and those measured by MPI of 4.8  ±  1.1 cm s-1. Magnetic particle imaging is a new tool with which to measure and quantify flow velocities. It is fast, radiation-free, and produces 3D images. It therefore offers the potential for vascular imaging.de_DE
tuhh.publisher.doi10.1088/1361-6560/aab136-
tuhh.publication.instituteBiomedizinische Bildgebung E-5de_DE
tuhh.type.opus(wissenschaftlicher) Artikel-
tuhh.institute.germanBiomedizinische Bildgebung E-5de
tuhh.institute.englishBiomedizinische Bildgebung E-5de_DE
tuhh.gvk.hasppnfalse-
dc.type.driverarticle-
dc.type.casraiJournal Article-
tuhh.container.issue6de_DE
tuhh.container.volume63de_DE
tuhh.container.startpage064001de_DE
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.creatorGNDKaul, Michael-
item.creatorGNDSalamon, Johannes-
item.creatorGNDKnopp, Tobias-
item.creatorGNDIttrich, Harald-
item.creatorGNDAdam, Gerhard-
item.creatorGNDWeller, Horst-
item.creatorGNDJung, Caroline-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairetypeArticle-
item.creatorOrcidKaul, Michael-
item.creatorOrcidSalamon, Johannes-
item.creatorOrcidKnopp, Tobias-
item.creatorOrcidIttrich, Harald-
item.creatorOrcidAdam, Gerhard-
item.creatorOrcidWeller, Horst-
item.creatorOrcidJung, Caroline-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
crisitem.author.deptBiomedizinische Bildgebung E-5-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0002-1589-8517-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0003-2967-6955-
crisitem.author.parentorgStudiendekanat Elektrotechnik, Informatik und Mathematik-
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